Recent YaleGlobal Articles

Joseph Chamie
May 18, 2017
Postsecondary education, regarded as essential in a competitive global job market, is credited for increasing prosperity for individuals and their communities. Greater numbers of students pursue higher education, but rising costs of college force many to rely on loans. Tuition for attending a...
June Teufel Dreyer
May 16, 2017
The South China Sea quandary continues. In summer of 2016, the international Permanent Court of Arbitration at the Hague issued a ruling in a case brought by the Philippines, rejecting China’s claims to most of the sea along with construction of artificial islands. The Philippines, under Rodrigo...
François Godement
May 11, 2017
Emmanuel Macron took a political risk, fiercely defending the European project, to win the French presidential race. His decisive victory, capturing 65 percent of the vote over populist Marine Le Pen’s 35 percent, lifts the confidence for all who support the principles that Europe is stronger as a...
Carol E. B. Choksy and Jamsheed K. Choksy
May 9, 2017
During ceasefire talks in early May, Russia proposed creation of de-escalation zones, with itself, Iran and Turkey as guarantors. Partition is necessary, argue Carol E. B. Choksy and Jamsheed K. Choksy of Indiana University. “But having three nations that greatly abet the strife serve as enforcers...
Jolyon Howorth
May 3, 2017
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization began in 1949, with 12 members, to curtail possible aggression against Europe. NATO now has 28 members, and Jolyon Howorth, an expert on European security and visiting professor at Yale University, analyzes the alliance’s transformations since the fall of the...
Ehsan M. Ahrari
May 2, 2017
Starting wars is easy, but bringing them to a successful close, ensuring a sustained peace, is not. The war in in Afghanistan is in its 16th year with no end in sight. “The growing presence of the so-called Afghan-Pakistani Daesh franchise – also known as the Islamic State Khorasan Province, or...
Joergen Oerstroem Moeller
April 27, 2017
The European Council meets April 29, to prepare for negotiations and its stance on the United Kingdom parting ways with the European Union. “The stage is set for a dramatic – traumatic – meeting with destiny for Britain and its former 27 partners,” explains author Joergen Oerstroem Moeller. “Five...
Richard Weitz
April 25, 2017
The devastating power and ethical challenges of modern nuclear weapons ensure no winners regardless of which nation might launch first. The United States and Russia hold the most nuclear weapons and, despite differences in many areas, are best equipped to lead on all aspects of global nuclear...
Kingsley Chiedu Moghalu
April 20, 2017
“The rise of populism in the Western world redefines the notion of political risk and teaches that risk has no permanent address,” explains Kingsley Chiedu Moghalu, professor of international business and public policy at the Fletcher School at Tufts University and a former deputy governor of the...
Paul Bracken
April 18, 2017
Nine countries possess about 15,000 nuclear weapons, reports the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons. These weapons have become almost an afterthought as leaders of Russia and United States talk about modernizing nuclear arsenals - until crises emerge, such as the recent series of...
Dilip Hiro
April 13, 2017
Turkey, a member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization since 1952, was recognized as candidate for full membership in the European Union in 1999. But under Recep Tayyip Erdoğan – president since 2014 and prime minister before that since 2003 – the country’s relations with the EU have...
Robert A. Manning
April 11, 2017
Chinese officials have described the US-China relationship as “dangerously strained,” and the first summit between US President Donald Trump and China's President Xi Jinping may “stand out as an important first step in redefining and stabilizing a troubled and unsettled US-China relationship...
Mohammed Ayoob
April 6, 2017
Politics in Turkey, under President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, have already edged away from the parliamentary system toward an executive presidency. An April 16 referendum on an amendment to the constitution would confirm the strong presidency, “allowing Erdoğan to exercise unbridled power possibly for...
Thomas Graham
April 4, 2017
A diplomat for Napoleon Bonaparte once cautioned that Russia’s adversaries must avoid underestimating the country’s capabilities or overreacting. With that warning in mind, Thomas Graham, a senior fellow with the Jackson Institute of Global Affairs, analyzes the US approach that underestimated...
Joanna Korey
March 30, 2017
At the close of the 20th century, democracy was the world’s most popular form of governance, an inspiring force. Then the 2008 economic crisis struck, a result of excess and debt, and eroded trust in national and global democratic institutions to identify and resolve big challenges. Increasing...
Harsh V Pant
March 28, 2017
With joint military exercises, weapons sales and multilateral conferences, Russia is reclaiming a role as a key powerhouse in Central and South Asia that it held during the Cold War. With a more isolationist administration in Washington, Moscow is also joining with China to fill a power vacuum in...
Börje Ljunggren
March 23, 2017
North Korea, intent on developing its nuclear weapons program, has conducted at least six increasingly advanced missile tests this year. The nation is a threat and could attack South Korea, Japan, US naval bases in the Pacific or even the US mainland in the not-so-distant future. Tackling this...
Bruce Stokes
March 21, 2017
The perceptions of national identity vary sharply among and within countries, especially between urban and rural areas. “A Pew Research Center survey finds that people generally place a relatively low premium on a person’s birthplace: Only 13 percent of Australians, 21 percent of Canadians, 32...
Joseph Chamie
March 16, 2017
Out-of-wedlock childbirths have become more common worldwide since the 1960s, but with wide variations among and within countries. Inreasing economic independence and education combined with modern birth control methods have given women more control over family planning. In about 25 countries,...
David Dapice
March 14, 2017
US lawmakers tried to rein in government spending by imposing a debt ceiling that must be lifted occasionally in order for the country to pay its bills. In October, US Congress suspended the US federal debt limit until March 15 of this year, explains economist David Dapice, though the ceiling has...

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