Recent YaleGlobal Articles

Paul Freedman
March 11, 2003
In the Middle Ages, spices were valued commodities, but not, as most people assume, for their ability to preserve meat. Rather, it was because medieval cuisine placed a premium on a variety of flavors. Spices were also thought to have medicinal properties, adding to their allure. These are only...
保罗•弗雷德曼(Paul Freedman)
March 11, 2003
在中世纪,香料是贵重商品。很多人以为,这是因为它们有防止肉类腐烂的能力;其实不是的。相反,这是因为中世纪烹饪鼓励风味的多样性,而这些风味只能由香料来提供。人们在当时还认为香料有医疗保健的特性,这增加了香料对人们的吸引力。这些只是香料获得如此之声望并最终成为全球交易之产品的部分原因,而它们反过来又有助于发展相互联系的经济网络。对香料的找寻不仅驱动了与贸易有关的全球化,也为殖民主义和全球帝国铺平了道路。——耶鲁全球
M.J. Akbar
March 6, 2003
Providing space for economic refugees is the key to maintaining a balanced globalization. The countries that have best accommodated economic refugees, like the US and India, are the ones that also tend to benefit the most from the skills these individuals bring. But the worry is that countries want...
David Dapice
March 3, 2003
If you look past its formidable military machine, America is not as powerful as it seems. Tufts University economist David Dapice points out that the current view of the United States as a “hyper-power” fails to take into account the country's many economic vulnerabilities. A country that...
Joe Clark
February 27, 2003
While there is no clear consensus for invading Iraq, the international community agrees that Iraq must not be given any alternative to eliminating its banned weapons. Joe Clark, Canada’s 16th Prime Minister, and Alton Frye, Presidential Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, argue that...
Immanuel Wallerstein
February 26, 2003
It has been long time in the making, but the debate over the wisdom of attacking Iraq has revealed how far apart the alliance forged after World War II has grown. In the past, despite reservations European countries may have had about specific US policies, they have tended to support the US because...
Martin Shubik
February 25, 2003
With world opinion turning against the planned US war against Iraq there is a crying need for the US to assure the international community that it is not seeking domination. Martin Shubik, a noted game theorist who has been a consultant to several American administrations, says the dangers to world...
Richard K. Betts
February 22, 2003
Now that a US-led war against Iraq is a near certainty - unless a coup d'etat removes Saddam Hussein - the focus is shifting to the question of its consequences. Political and strategic analyst Richard Betts looks at the possible outcomes of the war, which he thinks is a "bad idea"...
Larry A. Niksch
February 21, 2003
Despite persistent reluctance from China, Russia, and South Korea, the US has continued to call for a multi-lateral effort to dissuade North Korea from expanding its nuclear program. Why are these countries - North Korea's closest neighbors - dragging their feet on addressing the issue?...
Michael Yahuda
February 19, 2003
Since the early 1990s, China has been making a concerted effort to integrate itself into the world economy and cultivate relations with its Asian neighbors, as well as the U.S., in order to promote stability and prosperity in the region. Michael Yahuda, professor of international relations at the...
Shada Islam
February 14, 2003
The status of the US as 'the leader of the free world' has come under threat again this week, but the US may not be the only one to get hurt. In an unprecedented challenge to American leadership in NATO, France, Germany, and Belgium vetoed a US proposal to create contingency plans for...
Bernard K. Gordon
February 13, 2003
Against most predictions, the Bush administration successfully wooed both Singapore and Chile into free trade agreements, with huge perceived benefits for US investors. Paradoxically, this move away from multilateralism and global trade institutions is not in the interest of the US, the world...
Yu Bin
February 11, 2003
China is in no position to tell North Korea what to do regarding the current nuclear crisis. Since the end of the Korean War in 1953, Beijing's relations with Pyongyang have soured. At the same time, China has cultivated political and economic relations with both South Korea and the United...
Pat Sewell
February 10, 2003
In her recent book, World on Fire, Yale University professor Amy Chua argues that it is the resentment of long-standing minority domination that has so much of the world’s citizens ready to take up arms. Pat Sewell examines the author’s contentions and assesses her sweeping proposals for solving...
Thomas L. Friedman
February 8, 2003
Who were the September 11 hijackers? What impelled them to bring about "such a bursting of the frontiers of civilization"? Thomas L. Friedman, the foreign affairs columnist at The New York Times and author of "The Lexus and the Olive Tree," spent the last fourteen months...
Harold James
February 5, 2003
The debate about globalization has changed since September 11th. As Harold James, professor of history at Princeton University, points out, the terrorist attacks have led to calls for more controls on the free flow of capital, goods, and people, while the Enron scandal has sparked debates about...
Tom Friedman
February 3, 2003
With the lengthening shadow of war and terrorism and the shrinking of the global market, many see globalization as receding, if not coming to its end. But one of the world's most well-known commentators on globalization, Thomas L. Friedman, the New York Times foreign affairs columnist, sees...
Donald K. Emmerson
January 29, 2003
The globalization of democracy, long a staple of American foreign policy, has created nations who no longer are willing to simply follow the lead of the United States in foreign affairs. In such a global environment, the United States finds itself acting in an increasingly undemocratic manner,...
Nayan Chanda
January 28, 2003
Since the first test of a nuclear weapon at Alamogordo, New Mexico on a summer day in 1945, a terrible device for mass slaughter has continued to gain ground. Although only five permanent members of the UN Security Council are nuclear weapons powers, two others - India and Pakistan - have blasted...
Shada Islam
January 28, 2003
The expansion of the European Union to include another 75 million people in Eastern and Central Europe is an event of monumental proportion. Negotiations remain underway as 10 new countries adjust their economies and polities to EU standards on agriculture, trade, human rights, and other issues....

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