Recent YaleGlobal Articles

Shada Islam
January 28, 2003
The expansion of the European Union to include another 75 million people in Eastern and Central Europe is an event of monumental proportion. Negotiations remain underway as 10 new countries adjust their economies and polities to EU standards on agriculture, trade, human rights, and other issues....
Strobe Talbott
January 23, 2003
US President George W. Bush seems to have his heart set on going to war against Iraq. No matter what entreaties for patience are offered, he appears more convinced than ever that military action to bring down Saddam Hussein is the only way to ensure Iraq will not threaten the world with biological...
Frank Griffel
January 21, 2003
Far from being anathema to Islamic societies of the Middle East, globalization has strengthened Islamic fundamentalism in the region by facilitating extensive networks of formerly dissociated Muslims - so says Yale Islamic Studies professor Frank Griffel, in the second half of this series on...
Barry Rubin
January 16, 2003
Globalization has been heralded both as the savior and the damnation of the world. Especially the attitude of Islamic countries towards all that globalization brings has been a matter of intense debate. In the first of two-part series, Middle East scholar Barry Rubin argues that unlike regions like...
January 15, 2003
Is globalization unethical? That seems to be the view of many critics of globalization. Former President of Ireland and former United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson is taking an initiative to address that concern. The Ethical Globalization Initiative that she directs seeks...
Michael Richardson
January 14, 2003
Flora and fauna have long moved around the globe along with wandering human beings. As the native Indians in North America learned after the arrival of diseases from the Old World, not all these exchanges have been beneficial. In recent years this problem has become even more acute, as increased...
Bertil Lintner
January 10, 2003
Globalization is often described in terms of increased 'flows' or 'movements' of money, ideas, or goods. But the movement of people across national borders remains highly regulated and a point of major contention between many countries. Governments of rich industrialized...
Bruce Mazlish
January 3, 2003
Although there is nothing totally new under the sun, there is merit in studying the past from the newly acquired global perspective. The traditional way of looking at history - bound in geographical space and bracketed in a particular time period - is no longer adequate. Scientific and...
James Gustave Speth
December 27, 2002
We live in a world where air and oceans know no national boundaries, and where political choices made in one area have direct repercussions for others. Carbon dioxide emissions from automobiles and electricity plants in the US must be reduced today to avoid heating up our globe even more in coming...
Hilton L. Root
December 19, 2002
The spiraling economic woes of Argentina, Brazil, and other Latin American countries virtually fill the headlines every few months. What can governments in the region do to reverse negative trends and move their economies back to an era of growth and prosperity? Many people in Latin America blame...
Amy Kapczynski
December 16, 2002
In 1998, 39 pharmaceutical companies filed a lawsuit against South Africa. They hoped to stop the government from producing the generic drugs that would have made treatment affordable for the country's AIDS victims. A public outcry ensued, and critics accused pharmaceutical companies of...
James A. Kelly
December 12, 2002
Just a day before North Korea announced the resumption of the operation of a nuclear reactor closed since 1994, a top US official gave for the first time a personal account of his meeting with North Korean officials. He said that after reviewing the Clinton administration’s North Korea policy, the...
Christina Klein
December 9, 2002
Taiwan-born director Ang Lee won accolades for turning a Chinese novel into the fantastical, money-making movie, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. With undeniably Chinese martial arts action and a romantic story the Brothers Grimm would have praised, Lee's blockbuster appealed to audiences the...
Sidney Jones
December 6, 2002
The war on terror in Southeast Asia has a quickened tempo in the wake of the discovery of a bombing plot in Singapore and the Bali bomb attacks killing nearly 200 people. These heightened anti-terrorist measures come just as countries like Indonesia and the Philippines are emerging from years of...
Richard Katz
December 4, 2002
Japanese exports have been at the forefront of the globalization of its manufacturing sector, and yet the Japanese economy as a whole remains remarkably insular. If Japan is to dig itself out of its current deep economic crisis, the solution has to be further opening of the country and increased...
Allen J. Scott
November 29, 2002
Hollywood films represent more than half, and sometimes more than two-thirds of total box-office receipts in major markets. Films that succeed in the US market also tend to succeed in foreign markets. This suggests that a convergence of popular taste may be coming about, though in many countries...
Strobe Talbott
November 26, 2002
The Iraq crisis could have the ironic but salutary effect of reinvigorating the United Nations, revealing George W. Bush to be more of a multilateralist than the rest of the world thought (and feared), and establishing a welcome degree of continuity in American foreign policy. - YaleGlobal
Amartya Sen
November 19, 2002
The throngs of protestors that flock to every major international conference or summit claim as their goal the reversal of Western-dominated globalization. But these protestors, themselves the products of globalization, often find their constructive criticism drowned out by inflammatory rhetoric....
Nayan Chanda
November 19, 2002
Nayan Chanda
November 19, 2002

Pages