Excerpts

  • Dilip Hiro
    Nation Books, 2009
    ISBN: 978-1-56858-427-0

    Historic shifts have provided an opportunity for the world to move from the tutelage of the sole superpower, America, to a multi-polar global order, one where America’s moral, economic, and military leadership will be profoundly challenged. What form will this world resemble? What are the perils and promises of this new power order? In After Empire, Dilip Hiro provides a realistic, challenging, and nuanced look at the emerging power politics of the coming century and considers how they are going to turn our world upside-down.

  • Daniel Griswold
    Cato Institute, 2009
    ISBN: 978-1935308195

    The book explains the benefits of free trade and globalization for middle-class, Main Street Americans. It offers a spirited defense of free trade and globalization that engages the populists on their own turf. It shows how middle- and low-income families benefit from import competition, and how a more globalized U.S. economy has created better jobs and higher living standards for American workers through the ups and downs of the business cycle.

  • Guobin Yang
    Columbia University Press, 2009
    ISBN: 978-0231144209

    Since the mid-1990s, the Internet has revolutionized popular expression in China, enabling users to organize, protest, and influence public opinion in unprecedented ways. Guobin Yang’s pioneering study maps an innovative range of contentious forms and practices linked to Chinese cyberspace, delineating a nuanced and dynamic image of the Chinese Internet as an arena for creativity, community, conflict, and control. Like many other contemporary protest forms in China and the world, Yang argues, Chinese online activism derives its...

  • Reza Aslan
    Random House, 2009
    ISBN:978-1400066728

    “How to Win a Cosmic War” is both an in-depth study of the ideology fueling Al Qaeda, the Taliban, and like-minded militants throughout the Muslim world, and an exploration of religious violence in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Surveying the global scene from Israel to Iraq and from New York to the Netherlands, Aslan argues that religion is a stronger force today than it has been in a century. At a time when religion and politics are increasingly sharing the same vocabulary and functioning in the same sphere, Aslan writes that we must...

  • Thomas L. Friedman
    New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008
    ISBN:978-0-374-16685-4

    Economic growth, speeded by globalization and demanding populations, is slowly destroying the planet as we know it. Every minute, yet another species vanishes, reducing the earth’s biodiversity and untapped potential of rich plant and animal resources. In his book “Hot, Flat and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution and How It Can Renew America,” Thomas Friedman makes a passionate argument to recognize what is being lost and to establish a new conservation ethic to reverse some dangerous trends.

  • Pallavi Aiyar
    New Delhi: Fourth Estate, 2008
    ISBN:978-817223-746-2

    In the many comparisons about Asia’s two most populous nations, India is often categorized as an unruly democracy and China as a rigid economic powerhouse. But the contributions and challenges for both nations remain rich, subtle and unfolding, reminds Pallavi Aiyar, correspondent for the “Hindu” group of publications. In her book, “Smoke and Mirrors: An Experience of China,” Aiyar describes her curiosity and process of exploring China by getting to know people in all walks of life. “What I had learnt then was that it was deeply wrong...

  • Kishore Mahbubani
    New York: Public Affairs, 2008
    ISBN:978-1-58648-466-8

    Asians have absorbed many Western practices in economics, corporate governance, the rule of law and technology. As a result, by 2050, the world’s three largest economies will be China, India and Japan. To remain relevant, global groups must graciously welcome and incorporate emerging economic powers, writes Kishore Mahbubani, dean and professor of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore. In Chapter 6 of his book, “The New Asian Hemisphere,” Mahbubani assesses the role of the United Nations.

  • Ahmed Rashid
    New York: Viking Adult, 2008
    ISBN:978-0-670-01970-0

    Poverty, with no opportunity for work or education, leads to a desperation that can be exploited by extremists. Ahmed Rashid, journalist and author, reviews how the US invaded Afghanistan in 2001 and allied with Pakistan, but seven years later, neither nation of Central Asia enjoys economic or political stability. By emphasizing a military approach, the US and Pakistan expanded the influence of extremists, creating a chaotic environment, where strategies for terror unfold and pose dangers for the region and globe.

  • Ellen L. Frost
    Boulder, Colorado: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2008
    ISBN:978-1-58826-579-1

    Despite multiple complexities and cultures, Asia is integrating in new ways. “Not for centuries has that region been so fluid, so open, so cosmopolitan,” writes Ellen L. Frost in the introduction to her book “Asia’s New Regionalism.” Connections in the world’s largest, most populated and economically dynamic continent are particularly intense and innovative along Asia’s coastal areas, notes Frost, a visiting fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. Rather than stand by as mere onlookers, any nation or...

  • Strobe Talbott
    New York: Simon & Schuster, 2008
    ISBN:978-0-7432-9408-9

    Calls for global governance increasingly emerge, as global problems move to the top of national agendas. Those living in powerful nations fear that global government might reduce the power of nations and eliminate freedoms. Strobe Talbott - president of the Brookings Institution, former deputy secretary of state from 1994 to 2001, and founding director of the Yale Center for the Study of Globalization - has traced what he calls “the great experiment of global governance from the origins of the concept in ancient religion and philosophy...

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