Excerpts

  • Reza Aslan
    Random House, 2009
    ISBN:978-1400066728

    “How to Win a Cosmic War” is both an in-depth study of the ideology fueling Al Qaeda, the Taliban, and like-minded militants throughout the Muslim world, and an exploration of religious violence in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Surveying the global scene from Israel to Iraq and from New York to the Netherlands, Aslan argues that religion is a stronger force today than it has been in a century. At a time when religion and politics are increasingly sharing the same vocabulary and functioning in the same sphere, Aslan writes that we must...

  • Teresita C. Schaffer
    Center for Strategic & International Studies, June 16, 2009
    ISBN: 978-0892065721

    Teresita C. Schaffer examines the new strategic partnership between the United States and India. The two governments have a vigorous military-to-military relationship, reflecting similar security interests. They have devoted much less attention to creating a common vision of the world, and regularly spar in multilateral settings. The big global issues in the coming decade, however, including climate change, nuclear proliferation, and international financial reform, cannot be addressed without India. This book proposes a policy of...

  • Dilip Hiro
    Nation Books, 2009
    ISBN: 978-1-56858-427-0

    Historic shifts have provided an opportunity for the world to move from the tutelage of the sole superpower, America, to a multi-polar global order, one where America’s moral, economic, and military leadership will be profoundly challenged. What form will this world resemble? What are the perils and promises of this new power order? In After Empire, Dilip Hiro provides a realistic, challenging, and nuanced look at the emerging power politics of the coming century and considers how they are going to turn our world upside-down.

  • Daniel Griswold
    Cato Institute, 2009
    ISBN: 978-1935308195

    The book explains the benefits of free trade and globalization for middle-class, Main Street Americans. It offers a spirited defense of free trade and globalization that engages the populists on their own turf. It shows how middle- and low-income families benefit from import competition, and how a more globalized U.S. economy has created better jobs and higher living standards for American workers through the ups and downs of the business cycle.

  • Susan Ariel Aaronson and Jamie M. Zimmerman
    Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008
    ISBN:978-0-521-69420-9

    Imbalanced trade is controversial trade - and imbalances in information, income, substitutes, mobility or access are common between wealthy countries and poor ones. Governments can use trade agreements to advance human rights, directly or indirectly, argue Susan Aaronson and Jamie Zimmerman in their book “Trade Imbalance: The Struggle to Weigh Human Rights Concerns in Trade Policymaking.” Aaronson is research associate professor of international affairs at the Elliott School of International Affairs and adjunct associate professor at the...

  • Benny Widyono
    Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2008
    ISBN:0742555534

    After years of war and atrocities in Cambodia, a peace agreement was signed in France in 1991, providing UN authority to share power with an array of factions over the troubled nation. The following year, Benny Widyono arrived as member of a UN team to pick up the pieces for a country that had long been a pawn in major power struggle for Southeast Asia. Widyono eventually became personal envoy to the UN secretary-general, and his book, “Dancing in Shadows: Sihanouk, the Khmer Rouge, and the United Nations” details the history behind the...

  • Mohammed Ayoob
    Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 2008
    ISBN:978-0-472-06971-3

    About one out of every four people in the world practice Islam.Since the 9/11 attacks in 2001 and the US response, the study of “political Islam” has become a “growth industry” in the West, too often narrowly defined as a threat, explains Mohammed Ayoob, professor of international relations, in his book “The Many Faces of Political Islam: Religion and Politics in the Muslim World.” In reality, Islam and other religious traditions wield similar influence over politics. Ayoob examines the complex interplay between domestic concerns in various...

  • Alexandra Harney
    New York: The Penguin Press, 2008
    ISBN:978-1594201578

    Shoppers, manufacturers, workers and public officials are increasingly discomforted, even feeling guilt, by what has become known as the “China price” - the lowest price possible. Low prices carry the cost of environmental degradation, human-rights violations, health hazards and misery, argues Alexandra Harney in her book, “The China Price: The True Cost of Chinese Competitive Advantage.” Large multinational firms impose standards, overlooking falsified reports from managers and suppliers. A former reporter for the Financial Times, Harney...

  • Thomas L. Friedman
    New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008
    ISBN:978-0-374-16685-4

    Economic growth, speeded by globalization and demanding populations, is slowly destroying the planet as we know it. Every minute, yet another species vanishes, reducing the earth’s biodiversity and untapped potential of rich plant and animal resources. In his book “Hot, Flat and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution and How It Can Renew America,” Thomas Friedman makes a passionate argument to recognize what is being lost and to establish a new conservation ethic to reverse some dangerous trends.

  • Pallavi Aiyar
    New Delhi: Fourth Estate, 2008
    ISBN:978-817223-746-2

    In the many comparisons about Asia’s two most populous nations, India is often categorized as an unruly democracy and China as a rigid economic powerhouse. But the contributions and challenges for both nations remain rich, subtle and unfolding, reminds Pallavi Aiyar, correspondent for the “Hindu” group of publications. In her book, “Smoke and Mirrors: An Experience of China,” Aiyar describes her curiosity and process of exploring China by getting to know people in all walks of life. “What I had learnt then was that it was deeply wrong...

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