Excerpts

  • Ahmed Rashid
    New York: Viking Adult, 2008
    ISBN:978-0-670-01970-0

    Poverty, with no opportunity for work or education, leads to a desperation that can be exploited by extremists. Ahmed Rashid, journalist and author, reviews how the US invaded Afghanistan in 2001 and allied with Pakistan, but seven years later, neither nation of Central Asia enjoys economic or political stability. By emphasizing a military approach, the US and Pakistan expanded the influence of extremists, creating a chaotic environment, where strategies for terror unfold and pose dangers for the region and globe.

  • Kishore Mahbubani
    New York: Public Affairs, 2008
    ISBN:978-1-58648-466-8

    Asians have absorbed many Western practices in economics, corporate governance, the rule of law and technology. As a result, by 2050, the world’s three largest economies will be China, India and Japan. To remain relevant, global groups must graciously welcome and incorporate emerging economic powers, writes Kishore Mahbubani, dean and professor of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore. In Chapter 6 of his book, “The New Asian Hemisphere,” Mahbubani assesses the role of the United Nations.

  • Thomas L. Friedman
    New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008
    ISBN:978-0-374-16685-4

    Economic growth, speeded by globalization and demanding populations, is slowly destroying the planet as we know it. Every minute, yet another species vanishes, reducing the earth’s biodiversity and untapped potential of rich plant and animal resources. In his book “Hot, Flat and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution and How It Can Renew America,” Thomas Friedman makes a passionate argument to recognize what is being lost and to establish a new conservation ethic to reverse some dangerous trends.

  • Jonathan Fenby
    London: Ecco, an Imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, 2008
    ISBN:978-0-06-166116-7

    In both intentional ways and unintentional, China is an ambitious international force. For China, rapid-fire political, social and economic change marks the past 150 years - and Jonathan Fenby, editor of the research service Trusted Sources and former editor of the Observer and the South China Morning Post, reviews that history, revealing how China’s past sets a direction and pace for China’s future.

  • Strobe Talbott
    New York: Simon & Schuster, 2008
    ISBN:978-0-7432-9408-9

    Calls for global governance increasingly emerge, as global problems move to the top of national agendas. Those living in powerful nations fear that global government might reduce the power of nations and eliminate freedoms. Strobe Talbott - president of the Brookings Institution, former deputy secretary of state from 1994 to 2001, and founding director of the Yale Center for the Study of Globalization - has traced what he calls “the great experiment of global governance from the origins of the concept in ancient religion and philosophy...

  • Dinesh C. Sharma
    HarperCollins Publishers, India, 2008
    ISBN:9788172237684

    In a few short decades, India transformed itself from a poor nation offering cheap labor to a technological powerhouse. In his book, “The Long Revolution: The Birth and Growth of India’s IT Industry,” science editor Dinesh C. Sharma details the history. This chapter describes how software talent developed after foreign firms established roots and Indian engineers quickly adapted to a fast-changing business environment. Talent and fast-changing market conditions spurred trade and innovation.

  • Ellen L. Frost
    Boulder, Colorado: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2008
    ISBN:978-1-58826-579-1

    Despite multiple complexities and cultures, Asia is integrating in new ways. “Not for centuries has that region been so fluid, so open, so cosmopolitan,” writes Ellen L. Frost in the introduction to her book “Asia’s New Regionalism.” Connections in the world’s largest, most populated and economically dynamic continent are particularly intense and innovative along Asia’s coastal areas, notes Frost, a visiting fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. Rather than stand by as mere onlookers, any nation or...

  • James Cuno
    Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2008
    ISBN:978-0-691-13712-4

    Laws can include or exclude, protect or harm. Nationalist retentionist cultural-property laws have failed to protect antiquities and the human record, argues James Cuno, president and director of the Art Institute of Chicago. Instead of encouraging the collection of all artifacts and displaying the historical evidence for all to observe and analyze, some nations use their power to control the narrative, selecting pieces that support their claim to power. All global citizens have a right to view ancient artifacts, regardless of where they...

  • Benny Widyono
    Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2008
    ISBN:0742555534

    After years of war and atrocities in Cambodia, a peace agreement was signed in France in 1991, providing UN authority to share power with an array of factions over the troubled nation. The following year, Benny Widyono arrived as member of a UN team to pick up the pieces for a country that had long been a pawn in major power struggle for Southeast Asia. Widyono eventually became personal envoy to the UN secretary-general, and his book, “Dancing in Shadows: Sihanouk, the Khmer Rouge, and the United Nations” details the history behind the...

  • Edited by Ernesto Zedillo
    Routledge, 2007
    ISBN:978-0-415-77185-6

    Contemporary globalization has been severely jeopardized by recent turmoil. The end of the economic expansion of the 1990s, the 9/11 tragedy, and the war in Iraq have shocked the international system to an extent not seen in years. Not only have the fairness and adequacy of globalization been doubted by various parties for some time now, but lately its very irreversibility has been called into question by the sheer force of geopolitical and economic turbulence. This book considers the forces that propel globalization and those that resist...

Pages