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Asia’s New Leaders Stir Ancestral Animosity

China, Japan and South Korea have new heads of state, and “The potential for diplomatic brinkmanship – or worse – is high,” reports David Pilling for the Financial Times. The three argue about territorial claims in nearby seas and send out military craft to ward off claims from others. The antagonism is a result of occupations, brutality and unresolved conflicts lingering from the 20th century – and Pilling points out that the new leaders, along with King Jong Un in North Korea, are descendants of leaders of the last century. “Bilateral relations between all four nations are bitter and unpredictable to say the least,” he writes, and he urges the international community to keep a close eye on three sets – North and South Korea, Japan and South Korea, and, the most volatile of all, Japan and China. The rhetoric from Northeast Asia suggests that the four nations are headed toward a dangerous military buildup – but there is still time for one of the four to demonstrate leadership by minimizing tough talk, pursuing common interests and emphasizing peace. – YaleGlobal

Asia’s New Leaders Stir Ancestral Animosity

Japan, China, South Korea are bluffing – or play a game of chicken
David Pilling
The Financial Times, 26 December 2012
Click here for the article in The Financial Times.
Source:The Financial Times
Rights:Copyright © The Financial Times Ltd 2012.