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For Syria’s Rebel Movement, Skype Is a Useful, Increasingly Dangerous Tool

Syrian government blocked the internet, but the rebels continue to communicate with one another and outside observers via satellite phones and dial-up modems and Skype. Amy Choznick, reporting for the New York Times, explains how a Homs activist skilled in technology is connecting multiple sites: “Using the connection, the activists in Saqba talked to rebel fighters on Skype and relayed to overseas activists details about clashes with government forces. A video showed the rebels’ bare-bones room, four battery backups that could power a laptop for eight hours and a generator set up on a balcony.” Much of equipment was smuggled into the country with the help of relatives abroad and other supporters. Skype encrypts each call, but Choznick reports that Iran may have provided the Syrian regime with malware installed on computers for monitoring activities and pinpointing locations before encryption takes place. Technologies designed for communication can lead to unwanted connections. Users who seek privacy must consider how to detach identities and locations every step of the way. – YaleGlobal

For Syria’s Rebel Movement, Skype Is a Useful, Increasingly Dangerous Tool

Syrian regime cuts off internet, but rebels rely on Skype calls; Syria and Iran develop malware to track Skype calls, online activities and locations
Amy Chozick
The New York Times, 5 December 2012
Click here for the article in The New York Times.

Liam Stack contributed reporting from New York; Hala Droubi from Dubai, United Arab Emirates; and Hwaida Saad from Beirut, Lebanon.

Source:The New York Times
Rights:Copyright © 2012 The New York Times Company