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Treaty on the Seas Is in Rough Senate Waters

A few US senators are blocking ratification of the Law of the Sea Convention treaty, signed by 160 countries since 1982. The treaty, in effect since 1994, sets the parameters of international navigation with guidelines for countries’ use of deep-sea resources such as mining and fishing. Countries bordering seas can claim economic sovereignty out to 200 nautical miles, explains Walter Pincus for the Washington Post. Former US President Ronald Reagan agreed to abide by the treaty in all areas except for deep-sea mining in 1983. Senators who oppose the treaty see it as a threat to US sovereignty, claiming it places restrictions on energy companies with drilling capabilities 600 miles offshore. Critics also suggest the treaty makes the US vulnerable to lawsuits in the International Tribunal Law of the Sea or could lead to carbon restrictions. By refusing to sign the treaty, the US could lose on claims to offshore resources, warns former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin. Common grounds require protection. Narrow thinking threatens the very self-interest the law’s critics claim to protect. – YaleGlobal

Treaty on the Seas Is in Rough Senate Waters

Shortsighted US senators, worried about sovereignty, block the Law of the Sea treaty and protection of American shore interests
Walter Pincus
The Washington Post, 6 June 2012
 Click here for the article in The Washington Post.

 

Source:The Washington Post
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