Published on YaleGlobal Online Magazine (http://yaleglobal.yale.edu)
Home > We Need “Truth” Campaign for Digital Literacy and Data Tracking

We Need “Truth” Campaign for Digital Literacy and Data Tracking

Telecommunications firms, retailers, publications, lenders, social networks along with internet, email and health providers collect, store, analyze and share extraordinary amounts of customer data. In the United States, the government can access that data, too. Citizens are largely unaware, and journalist Josh Stearns describes the need for a national data literacy effort. Once individuals reveal their preferences, they have no control over how those are used. Data collectors take good guesses at users’ age, race and more – paving the way for discrimination in policies. “Changes in technology are developing faster than social and cultural norms can adapt,” Stearns writes. Likewise, government policy hasn’t kept up, and there are few checks and balances. Investment in digital literacy could be worthwhile, as Sterns notes that “a more digital savvy workforce will help protect against the cyber-attacks on government and industry that are escalating every year.” In the meantime, all individuals can do is to conduct every transaction and exchange as if the entire world is watching. – YaleGlobal

We Need “Truth” Campaign for Digital Literacy and Data Tracking

Phone companies, lenders, retailers – every industry – collect and track customer data; citizens need to develop digital literacy and be wary
Josh Stearns
PBS.org, 27 November 2012
 Click here for the article in PBS.org.

 Josh Stearns is a journalist, organizer and community strategist. He is journalism and public media campaign director for Free Press, a national, non-partisan, non-profit organization working to reform the media through education, organizing and advocacy. He was a co-author of "Saving the News: Toward a national journalism strategy," "Outsourcing the News: How covert consolidation is destroying newsrooms and circumventing media ownership rules," and "On the Chopping Block: State budget battles and the future of public media."

Source:PBS.org
Rights:Copyright© 1995 – 2009 Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). All rights reserved.