In The News

September 21, 2017
In the aftermath of the Arab Spring, Islamist parties across the Middle East and North Africa have achieved mixed results. As the Economist notes, the legacy of the Muslim Brotherhood, which began as an anti-imperialist social and educational movement in Egypt under Hassan al-Banna in 1928, gave way to Islamist offshoots, each iteration borne out of its own historical particularities and social...
September 17, 2017
Egypt’s Jewish community, about 80,000 before World War II, has been whittled down to 20 in recent years. The Economist describes an organization made up of Muslims and Jews, Drop of Milk, that is making a concerted effort to “preserve Egypt’s Jewish heritage.” The nation has a contentious past after four devastating wars with Israel, forced conversions and “Jews who worked alongside Egyptians...
Kate Hodal September 14, 2017
Governments that reduce taxes and cut programs cannot expect charitable giving to replace funding for an array of health, education or foreign aid programs. The most vulnerable will suffer, with disease, conflict, pollution, illiteracy and poverty posing cross-border consequences. Charitable giving may have created an incentive for governments to pursue budget cuts in every area, then replacing...
September 12, 2017
The protracted hostility between Saudi Arabia and Iran’s Arab allies may be cooling. The Economist observes that historically “the [Saudi] kingdom has been [on the] front of Sunni Islam’s anti-Shia dogma.” Following his ascension to the throne in 2015, “King Salman bin Abdelaziz and his young son and defence minister, Muhammad, set their sights on rolling back Iran’s influence from the region by...
September 10, 2017
French Artist JR erected a huge photo of an amused toddler gripping the top of the US border wall with Mexico and surveying the territory below, “leaving the impression the entire thing could be toppled with a giggle,” according to the Associated Press. The artwork prompts discussion about proposals to extend the wall the full length of the border, about 2000 miles, and was unveiled the same week...
Pumza Fihlani August 31, 2017
Small rural villages around the world are less isolated, and encroaching modern ways of life divide their people about how quickly to accept another language, women’s rights and family planning, schools and new curricula, or specialized businesses and consumerism. Pumza Fihlani of BBC News write about Namibia’s Himba people. “A steady stream of young men and women has been opting to leave the...
August 28, 2017
The legacy of the French settler-colonial project continues to impact the politics of education in Algeria. “The republic’s official language is standard Arabic, but few children grow up speaking it, so they often feel lost on their first day of school. Berber, the tongue of perhaps a quarter of Algerians, was officially recognised last year – but no one can agree on which of its six dialects...

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