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The following page lists the features that have been viewed the most by YaleGlobal Online visitors.

YaleGlobal Online Articles

Sumit Ganguly
YaleGlobal
, 30 September 2014
Promoting prosperity and national security for India requires robust foreign policy from Modi
David Brown
YaleGlobal
, 25 September 2014
Blocking China’s salami-slicing tactics on the South China Sea require region-wide cooperation
Tansen Sen
YaleGlobal
, 23 September 2014
China harkens the Silk Road in foreign policy initiatives, but the history is less benign
George Chen
YaleGlobal
, 11 September 2014
China fears democracy contagion to the mainland if true universal suffrage were allowed in Hong Kong
Paula Kavathas
YaleGlobal
, 18 September 2014
To combat Ebola, other infectious diseases, the US could impose $3 tax on international air travel

In the News

Gideon Rachman
Financial Times
, 1 October 2014
Mainland could view protesters as reasonable or spoiled
Talmiz Ahmad
The Hindu
, 1 October 2014
Countries in the Middle East scramble for new alliances
Knowledge@Wharton
, 28 January 2008
Western investors are only partly successful in reshaping the governing boards of foreign firms
Doni Bloomfield
Bloomberg
, 25 September 2014
Apple delays China debut; phones are resold for up to four times the US price

Videos

Daniel Yergin
, 18 June 2010

In an interview with Nayan Chanda, Daniel Yergin, one of the world’s leading experts on energy, discusses the future of dependence on oil and a push towards efficiency. He also talks about the “globalization of demand”, that the success of globalization is reflected in rising energy demand.

William J. Clinton
, 31 October 2003

Part 2 contains the speech of President Clinton, and Part 3 President Clinton's answers to questions posed by the students. Please install Real Player and click download in order to see the video.

William J. Clinton
, 31 October 2003

At the invitation of the Yale Center for the Study of Globalization, former United States President Bill Clinton delivered a public lecture on global challenges at Yale University. Part 1 shows the introductions by Richard C. Levin and Ernesto Zedillo. Please install Real Player and click download in order to see the video.

Podcasts

Daniel Boese
, 22 October 2010

Germany is demonstrating steady progress in unshackling itself from fossil fuel dependence by converting to renewable energy sources. But the government's delay in phasing out highly profitable nuclear power stations adds more uncertainty to the globe’s energy future.

Jonathan Fenby
, 13 April 2011

China, claiming an aversion to using force for international conflicts, hedges on Libya

Harsh V. Pant
, 1 April 2011

A new world order – depending on the BRICs – is not emerging anytime soon

Bound Together Column

Nayan Chanda
Businessworld
, 21 July 2009
All non-African females are descendants of L3 line from Africa, and males have Y chromosome M-168
Nayan Chanda
Businessworld
, 22 September 2014
Savvy businesses grasp globalization’s potential and innovate, using the world as their drawing board
Nayan Chanda
Businessworld
, 3 March 2008
Low production costs and technological advances drive industry relocation

Book Reviews

Stan Liebowitz
New York: Amacom
2003
The book examines exactly why so many e-commerce firms went wrong, and how, utilizing traditional economic concepts, businesses can build the foundation for success in the future.
Edited by Richard Giulianotti and Roland Robertson
Blackwell Publishing
2009
The book reveals that the study of globalization of sport, is a rich affair, open to the analysis of historians, anthropologists, economists and many other specialists.
Kishore Mahbubani
New York: Public Affairs
2008
The premise of Kishore Mahbubani's latest book is simple: If representative democracy is the best known form of governance for nations, then it's also the best form for the world.

Book Excerpts

Ian Shapiro
Princeton University Press
2007
Power expands to fill a vacuum. This holds for ideas no less than for military campaigns, as the George W Bush administration's national security doctrine has so dramatically underscored. (1) Announced in the wake of the September 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, it ranks as one of the most dramatic sea changes in U.S. national security policy ever. The Bush Doctrine has also turned traditional Republican Party foreign policy inside out and upside down. The congenital skeptics of foreign entanglements, whose leader heaped scorn on "nation building" in his 2000 presidential campaign, were transformed overnight into the world's self-appointed internationalists and policemen. The Bush administration committed itself to exporting American-style freedom and democracy worldwide, to confronting an "Axis of Evil" that was said to reach from to Tehran to Pyongyang, and to waging unilateral preemptive war by coalitions "of the willing" so as to achieve regime change as was undertaken in Iraq in March of 2003.
Ian Burma
Penguin Press
2006
Holland, and Amsterdam in particular, has a long history of taking in foreigners. Sephardic Jews arrived from Antwerp and farther south in the late 16th and early 17th centuries, many of them refugees from the Spanish Inquisition. The Dutch Republic in its Golden Age was wealthy and offered religious freedom. This actually prompted many Jews, who had let their traditions lapse or been forced to convert to Catholicism, to revive their faith. A large Portuguese synagogue was built in Amsterdam between 1671 and 1675, and another was built by Polish and German Ashkenazim in 1670. For a long time, Jews, many of them very poor, suffered from all kinds of professional and social restrictions, but they were not persecuted, until the Germans arrived in 1940. This earned Amsterdam the Yiddish name of Mokum, the City.
Daniel Griswold
Cato Institute
2009
The book explains the benefits of free trade and globalization for middle-class, Main Street Americans.

Academic Papers

Arvind Subramanian and Martin Kessler
Global Citizen Foundation
June 2013
David Lai
China Security Vol. 5 No. 1
Winter 2009
The PLA's move to go global is a natural outgrowth of China's expanding power