As governments confront many challenges that are global in scale, leaders find they must cooperate in responding to financial, climate, terrorism and other crises. As a result, a global audience has developed keen interest in how and why nations select their leaders. On one hand, citizens expect sensible and collective action, transparency and fair representation; on the other hand, citizens and leaders fret about compromising security, sovereignty or loss of control. Diplomats and global organizations like the United Nations aim to achieve a balance, even as global communications allow citizens in democracies or authoritarian states to steer attention to issues. Attention to citizen demands and multilateral cooperation contribute to stability.

Sea Change Awaits Trump in Thailand

Benjamin Zawacki
February 23, 2017

China Has Chance to Undercut US by Wooing Taiwan

Humphrey Hawksley
February 14, 2017

The Trump Factor in the French Election

Le Pen of France, like Trump, capitalizes on discontent over the establishment, job and cultural insecurity
François Godement
February 7, 2017

Donald Trump as President: Does It Mark a Rise of Illiberal Globalism?

Threats to international liberal order and democratic nations, both external and internal, shape new forms of globalization
Amitav Acharya
January 22, 2017

Rekindled Sino-Indian Tensions Roil Geopolitics in Asia

India and China’s rivalry intensifies over China’s veto on UN issues, territory, Pakistan and the Dalai Lama
Harsh V Pant
January 12, 2017

Don’t Bet on Enduring Republican Reset With Russia

For domestic politics, Russia’s President Putin may need rivalry with the US more than Trump as friend
Daniel Twining
January 10, 2017

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