As governments confront many challenges that are global in scale, leaders find they must cooperate in responding to financial, climate, terrorism and other crises. As a result, a global audience has developed keen interest in how and why nations select their leaders. On one hand, citizens expect sensible and collective action, transparency and fair representation; on the other hand, citizens and leaders fret about compromising security, sovereignty or loss of control. Diplomats and global organizations like the United Nations aim to achieve a balance, even as global communications allow citizens in democracies or authoritarian states to steer attention to issues. Attention to citizen demands and multilateral cooperation contribute to stability.

Illusions of Empire: Defining the New American Order

Five new books examine the state of the US 'empire'
G. John Ikenberry
March 2, 2004

China Clamps Down on Web News Discussion

The internet destabilizes Chinese politics
Mark Magnier
February 26, 2004

If We Go, Let's Stay Until Job Is Done

Haiti deserves a long-term commitment from the US
Joseph L. Galloway
February 25, 2004

Fischer Sees Turkey's Membership in EU as Part of War on Terror

German foreign minister speaks out for EU constitution, against direct democracy
Sam Hapgood
March 5, 2004

A Year After Iraq War: Mistrust of America in Europe Ever Higher, Muslim Anger Persists

Nine-country survey reveals gaps in views of war on terror and Iraq war
March 16, 2004

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