As governments confront many challenges that are global in scale, leaders find they must cooperate in responding to financial, climate, terrorism and other crises. As a result, a global audience has developed keen interest in how and why nations select their leaders. On one hand, citizens expect sensible and collective action, transparency and fair representation; on the other hand, citizens and leaders fret about compromising security, sovereignty or loss of control. Diplomats and global organizations like the United Nations aim to achieve a balance, even as global communications allow citizens in democracies or authoritarian states to steer attention to issues. Attention to citizen demands and multilateral cooperation contribute to stability.

The Revolt of a Disappointed Generation

Anger and anarchy spread from the birthplace of democracy
Manfred Ertel
December 18, 2008

Africa's Potemkin deception

Western donor governments and aid agencies overstate their success in Africa
Michael Holman
January 19, 2004

An Ancient Model for China's New Power

Paying tribute to Beijing
Eric Teo Chu Cheow
January 21, 2004

Countering Suspicions

The Berlin meeting of British, French and German leaders was merely a coalition of the willing
Klaus-Dieter Frankenberger
February 20, 2004

Politically Incorrect

The hard facts of climate change may end political protection for industries that pollute or fail to conserve energy
Nayan Chanda
January 23, 2009

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