As governments confront many challenges that are global in scale, leaders find they must cooperate in responding to financial, climate, terrorism and other crises. As a result, a global audience has developed keen interest in how and why nations select their leaders. On one hand, citizens expect sensible and collective action, transparency and fair representation; on the other hand, citizens and leaders fret about compromising security, sovereignty or loss of control. Diplomats and global organizations like the United Nations aim to achieve a balance, even as global communications allow citizens in democracies or authoritarian states to steer attention to issues. Attention to citizen demands and multilateral cooperation contribute to stability.

Democrats Push Obama for Smaller Tax Cut in Stimulus Package

Can more US spending put the brakes to the global economic crisis?
Peter Nicholas
January 10, 2009

China Censors Part of Obama Speech

With a flock so large, even Obama’s measured words are bound to ruffle a few feathers
Edward Wong
January 22, 2009

Latin America Looks for a Fresh Start With Obama

The region has globalized over the last eight years and should not be treated as an afterthought by the US
Tim Padgett
January 20, 2009

Obama’s Worst Pakistan Nightmare

Because of nuclear weapons, Pakistan stands as the bigger challenge for Obama than either Iraq or Afghanistan
David E. Sanger
January 13, 2009

Politically Incorrect

The hard facts of climate change may end political protection for industries that pollute or fail to conserve energy
Nayan Chanda
January 23, 2009

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