As governments confront many challenges that are global in scale, leaders find they must cooperate in responding to financial, climate, terrorism and other crises. As a result, a global audience has developed keen interest in how and why nations select their leaders. On one hand, citizens expect sensible and collective action, transparency and fair representation; on the other hand, citizens and leaders fret about compromising security, sovereignty or loss of control. Diplomats and global organizations like the United Nations aim to achieve a balance, even as global communications allow citizens in democracies or authoritarian states to steer attention to issues. Attention to citizen demands and multilateral cooperation contribute to stability.

An Alternative to Boycotts or Divestment for Israel

Boycotting Israeli firms that hire Palestinians won’t deliver peace; business-housing programs like New York’s Co-op City offer an alternative
Ian Shapiro and Nicholas Strong
May 26, 2016

With Eye on China, Obama Strengthens Ties With Vietnam

The US lifts an arms embargo for once nemesis Vietnam, but the latter does not want China to worry
Murray Hiebert
May 24, 2016

Bangladesh Accommodates Extremism, Spelling Danger for the Region

With a series of attacks and no crackdown on extremism, Bangladesh retreats from its secular, democratic beginnings
Sumit Ganguly
May 17, 2016

Of Two Minds on China

One side of China pursues openness and reforms; another side insists that unity and stability are paramount
Terry Lautz
May 12, 2016

The United States: Divided in More Ways Than One

Polarization on trade, security and immigration hobbles the US and its major parties, especially Republicans
Bruce Stokes
May 5, 2016

Russia Needs Options to Deal with China

To avoid marginalization and over-reliance on China, Russia should repair ties with the West
Thomas Graham
May 3, 2016

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