The links between security and globalization were highlighted by the 2001 terrorist attacks on New York City and Washington, DC, and the subsequent long wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Lingering poverty, inequality, religious extremism and war can sow discontent and resentment as unprecedented global mobility lends access to education and travel in other countries. Despite use of drones, cyber-warfare and other advanced weapons technology to mount counterterrorist attacks, the marginalized can strike out at vulnerable urban or economic centers. Annual global defense spending exceeds $1.6 trillion. Containing the trade in weapons, whether nuclear bombs or assault rifles, and preventing them from falling into the wrong hands remain a challenge.

Gaza Conflict Plays Out Online Through Social Media

Warring factions can’t stop ad hoc reports, and so join them by pressing their cases on Twitter and YouTube
Corey Flintoff
January 15, 2009

Ex-Arms Monitor Urges an Inquiry on Iraqi Threat

White House disagrees, calls for patience
Richard W. Stevenson
January 29, 2004

Obama’s Worst Pakistan Nightmare

Because of nuclear weapons, Pakistan stands as the bigger challenge for Obama than either Iraq or Afghanistan
David E. Sanger
January 13, 2009

Earthquake Narrows US-Iran Rift

Recent developments and "earthquake diplomacy" could mean that the time is right for a US-Iran rapprochement
Roshanak Taghavi
January 30, 2004

Save Pakistan to Save Us All

The international community would be foolish to dismiss Pakistan chaos as a regional problem in need of a military solution
Gautam Adhikari
January 12, 2009

Pages