Recent YaleGlobal Articles

S. Nihal Singh
May 17, 2004
India's surprise election results from last week have left everyone struggling to understand how the powerful BJP could lose so decisively in a time of economic prosperity. The answer, suggests S. Nihal Singh, a former editor of the Statesman of Calcutta and the Indian Express, lies in the...
Anthony J. Spires
May 14, 2004
To China, which has repeatedly faced American pressure to respect human rights, the international condemnation of US abuses in Iraq may seem like an ironic role reversal, writes China scholar Anthony J. Spires. While the Chinese government and official media have relished “returning the favor” by...
Strobe Talbott
May 12, 2004
Peace and stability in an expanded Europe cannot be separated from the fortunes of its giant neighbor to the east, Russia. President Vladimir Putin, who was recently won a second term in office, talks of being the president of a free people in a free country, but his actions so far have been marked...
Michael Richardson
May 10, 2004
Current arms control treaties make it easy for countries like North Korea and Iran to import the materials needed to make WMD. Yet despite widespread fear about terrorism, observes correspondent Michael Richardson, no effective international laws exist to prevent the sale or transfer of weapons or...
Seth Fein
May 7, 2004
The fact that US President George W. Bush addressed audiences on Arab television this week made clear to all that Washington sees a need to communicate better with people in the Middle East about its policies and programs. Nonetheless, says Yale historian Seth Fein, past US efforts to promote...
Andrew Lih
May 5, 2004
Many predicted that the rise of the Internet in the 1990s would herald an information technology 'revolution' that would change almost every aspect of human life. While the reality for many has proven less exciting than the hype, there is one small corner of cyberspace that is living up...
Shada Islam
May 3, 2004
As the celebrations over the expansion of the European Union die down, debates over the next big expansion proposal are sure to heat up. Talks on Turkey's entry into the European Union, however, won't be limited to a simple discussion of the economic benefits of regional consolidation....
Christina Klein
April 30, 2004
The blockbuster "Kill Bill" films exemplify the increasingly global nature of Hollywood, and not solely because of director Quentin Tarantino's heavy incorporation of foreign stylistic elements, writes media scholar Christina Klein. Like a growing number of Hollywood productions,...
S.L. Bachman
April 28, 2004
During the 1990s, Silicon Valley reigned supreme as the heart of technological innovation and the birthplace of the information technology revolution. Today, says globalization scholar S.L. Bachman, the tech hub is scrambling to mobilize regional resources to compete in the international...
Gabriel Weimann
April 26, 2004
Although technology may be value-free, in the hands of terrorists technological innovations can certainly help amplify the darker side of human nature. The Internet, observes communications scholar Gabriel Weimann, is no exception. The World Wide Web has been utilized by terrorist groups around...
Riaz Hassan
April 23, 2004
The weapon of mass destruction that seems to be favored most by terrorists is their own lives. But, though most suicide bombers are Islamic youths, sociologist Riaz Hassan argues that there is no direct link between suicide attacks and Islamic fanaticism. Suicide attacks, Hassan says, are...
Shada Islam
April 21, 2004
After winning March elections that attracted tremendous international attention, newly-elected Spanish Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero forewarned a significant shift in Spanish foreign policy. He declared his disapproval of the previous Popular Party's government active support of...
Michael Kraig
April 19, 2004
Critics point to the war in Iraq and President Bush's subsequent denial of reconstruction contracts to dissenting nations as proof of Washington's hegemonic tendencies. However, argues security expert Michael Kraig, the Iraq War is just the latest manifestation of a US foreign policy that...
Goenawan Mohamad
April 16, 2004
The rise of Al Qaeda has led many in the West to conflate Islam with anti-democratic political views. This is a mistake, argues Jakarta-based writer Goenawan Mohamad, given that the world's two largest Muslim countries - Indonesia and Malaysia - are solidly democratic. In Malaysia, the March...
Susan Moeller
April 14, 2004
After the September 11 terrorist attacks, President George W. Bush and Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld made the decision to present terrorism, weapons of mass destruction and Iraq as a linked triple threat. Susan Moeller, professor of media and international affairs at the University of...
Paul Mooney
April 12, 2004
For quite some time now, the Chinese government and its net-surfing citizens have been involved in a series of serious net games. While the government seems bent on restricting the free flow of certain types of information into China that it fears will prove destabilizing – such as Taiwan, the...
Jean-Pierre Lehmann
April 9, 2004
Although Kenya has attracted some foreign dollars through tourism and export-based flower and tea industries, a majority of Kenyans remain mired in poverty. Jean-Pierre Lehmann, founding director of the Evian group, argues here that although its future could be bright, Kenya has not yet exploited...
April 7, 2004
The process of globalization continues to produce new surprises. Thomas L. Friedman, whose 1999 classic “The Lexus and the Olive Tree” has been translated in 30 languages, offers an update on globalization since his last interview with YaleGlobal editor Nayan Chanda a year ago. Friedman says that...
Nayan Chanda
April 7, 2004
The following is a transcript of Nayan Chanda's interview with the New York Times foreign affairs columnist Thomas Friedman conducted on March 25, 2004.
Subscribe to Featured Articles