Recent YaleGlobal Articles

Dominic Sachsenmaier
April 30, 2003
Media coverage of the Iraq War varied to such an extent that viewers in the US and in Europe were left with distinctly different understandings of what was going on. Some Europeans claimed that America's 'embedded journalists' were simply 'in bed with' the US military,...
Nayan Chanda
April 28, 2003
As Beijing played host to the first US-North Korea talks, reports from Washington claimed that the Pentagon is seeking China's help in bringing about regime change in North Korea. Under Washington's urging, China indeed took the initiative to invite North Korea to Beijing for talks, but...
Ilona Kickbusch
April 25, 2003
As the economic consequences of Sars become more and more apparent, countries are scrambling for solutions. However, argues Ilona Kickbusch, Professor of Global Health at Yale University's School of Public Health, individual nation-states are unequipped to manage something like Sars by...
Michele A. Clark
April 23, 2003
Women and children have been among the biggest losers in this era of globalization, if we consider the massive increase in human trafficking in recent years. Cheated or sold into a life of sexual slavery or indentured servitude, the victims of human trafficking and their stories reveal the dark...
Michael Richardson
April 21, 2003
Greater openness in tourism and trade, on which much of Asia's recent economic growth has been based, is coming back to haunt countries from South Korea to Thailand. The extent of the economic fall-out from the Sars epidemic is only just becoming apparent, but WHO estimates already place the...
Riaz Hassan
April 17, 2003
The telephone, satellite television and the Internet have connected the Islamic community of 1.2 billion people across the globe. This connectivity has strengthened Muslims' sense of belonging to one community, which Islamic scholars call ummah. But it has also brought the realization that...
Shada Islam
April 15, 2003
British Prime Minister Tony Blair and Spain's Jose Maria Aznar have joined France and Germany in demanding that the United Nations play the central role in administering and rebuilding post-Saddam Iraq. Not only does the UN have the experience and the expertise to handle Iraq's...
Jeffrey E. Garten
April 11, 2003
In the months leading up to the war in Iraq, and in the weeks since the coalition to remove the Saddam Hussein regime began military action, many analysts predicted a backlash against US foreign policy in other regions. But in this article for YaleGlobal, Jeffrey Garten suggests that American...
Christine Loh
April 9, 2003
Although Hong Kong enjoys one of Asia's best public health systems, the spread of SARS has shown that even its well-run government has room for improvement. The former British colony's re-integration with China in 1997 has led to a booming expansion of trade and people flows across the...
Susan Ariel Aaronson
April 8, 2003
Global corporate social responsibility (CSR) is often agreed about in theory, and has informed the policy of some governments. However, its implementation is still far from ideal. While some countries make no effort to promote CSR, even the ones that do have left the terms of compliance uncertain....
April 4, 2003
Whether one is for or against the war in Iraq, one cannot underestimate the immense significance of the event to world affairs.. Hosted by the interdisciplinary program in Ethics, Politics and Economics at Yale University, six professors reflected on the war in Iraq, its buildup, and its aftermath...
Jeffrey E. Garten
April 2, 2003
In this article, Jeffrey Garten, Dean of the Yale School of Management, warns of the mismatch between America's economic policies and its “mushrooming overseas commitments.” In order to finance the global fight against terrorism and the arduous process of nation-building in places like...
Joan Johnson-Freese
March 31, 2003
To the surprise of its neighbors, Japan has taken action to protect itself from North Korea. After North Korea tested a ballistic missile in 1998, the usually slow-moving Japanese assembly decided immediately to build a space-based surveillance system. Japan launched two information-gathering...
Ramamurti Shankar
March 28, 2003
In many academic disciplines, books, journals, and letters have long been the preferred ways of communicating over long distances. Thanks to the 'information revolution' facilitated by the internet, though, today the spread of knowledge around the world can happen almost instantaneously...
Christina Klein
March 25, 2003
Often criticized for overwhelming global audiences with 'American culture', evidence from the past twenty years shows that Hollywood is expanding its embrace to include actors from Hong Kong, scripts from South Korea, and production facilities in New Zealand and China. With 50% of its...
Shada Islam
March 21, 2003
When the going was good, the European Union looked like a model of globalization. Fifteen countries appeared to have subjected their many historical, political and cultural differences to the altar of a united Europe. The European Union was emerging as the second superpower. But the bitter...
March 20, 2003
The coming war in Iraq will be complicated by the absence of a UN mandate, forcing the US military to take over administering the country. The pressure of the American electoral calendar may also prevent the Iraq war from opening a door to a Middle East peace settlement. In an interview in London...
François Godement
March 19, 2003
The build-up to the Iraq war has been marked by an unprecedented bitter falling out between the US and its European allies. In this opinion piece, a French scholar finds fault on both sides. The United States snubbed its European allies and did not try to reach out to global public opinion by...
Joan Johnson-Freese
March 14, 2003
A chain reaction of space activity, begun by Soviet-U.S competition in the 1960’s, has been duly catalyzed by China’s own manned space effort. The Middle Kingdom began its ventures into space in 1999, but soon it hopes to be only the third nation to have achieved human spaceflight. If this does...
保罗•弗雷德曼(Paul Freedman)
March 11, 2003
在中世纪,香料是贵重商品。很多人以为,这是因为它们有防止肉类腐烂的能力;其实不是的。相反,这是因为中世纪烹饪鼓励风味的多样性,而这些风味只能由香料来提供。人们在当时还认为香料有医疗保健的特性,这增加了香料对人们的吸引力。这些只是香料获得如此之声望并最终成为全球交易之产品的部分原因,而它们反过来又有助于发展相互联系的经济网络。对香料的找寻不仅驱动了与贸易有关的全球化,也为殖民主义和全球帝国铺平了道路。——耶鲁全球
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