Excerpts

  • Kishore Mahbubani
    New York: Public Affairs, 2008
    ISBN:978-1-58648-466-8

    Asians have absorbed many Western practices in economics, corporate governance, the rule of law and technology. As a result, by 2050, the world’s three largest economies will be China, India and Japan. To remain relevant, global groups must graciously welcome and incorporate emerging economic powers, writes Kishore Mahbubani, dean and professor of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore. In Chapter 6 of his book, “The New Asian Hemisphere,” Mahbubani assesses the role of the United Nations.

  • Thomas L. Friedman
    New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008
    ISBN:978-0-374-16685-4

    Economic growth, speeded by globalization and demanding populations, is slowly destroying the planet as we know it. Every minute, yet another species vanishes, reducing the earth’s biodiversity and untapped potential of rich plant and animal resources. In his book “Hot, Flat and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution and How It Can Renew America,” Thomas Friedman makes a passionate argument to recognize what is being lost and to establish a new conservation ethic to reverse some dangerous trends.

  • Ahmed Rashid
    New York: Viking Adult, 2008
    ISBN:978-0-670-01970-0

    Poverty, with no opportunity for work or education, leads to a desperation that can be exploited by extremists. Ahmed Rashid, journalist and author, reviews how the US invaded Afghanistan in 2001 and allied with Pakistan, but seven years later, neither nation of Central Asia enjoys economic or political stability. By emphasizing a military approach, the US and Pakistan expanded the influence of extremists, creating a chaotic environment, where strategies for terror unfold and pose dangers for the region and globe.

  • Strobe Talbott
    New York: Simon & Schuster, 2008
    ISBN:978-0-7432-9408-9

    Calls for global governance increasingly emerge, as global problems move to the top of national agendas. Those living in powerful nations fear that global government might reduce the power of nations and eliminate freedoms. Strobe Talbott - president of the Brookings Institution, former deputy secretary of state from 1994 to 2001, and founding director of the Yale Center for the Study of Globalization - has traced what he calls “the great experiment of global governance from the origins of the concept in ancient religion and philosophy...

  • Mark Matthews
    Nation Books, 2007
    ISBN:1-56858-332-X

    The Israeli-Palestinian conflict continues to haunt the Middle East, and peace remains an elusive goal for world leaders. Journalist Mark Matthews details and analyzes the many lost opportunities for resolving the conflict in recent years, starting with George Bush’s first visit to Israel as governor of Texas and potential presidential candidate, as described in this excerpt. Matthews’ thorough reporting reveals how people affected by such conflict depend on their leaders to seek out connections, overlook cultural differences and...

  • Edited by Ernesto Zedillo
    Routledge, 2007
    ISBN:978-0-415-77185-6

    Contemporary globalization has been severely jeopardized by recent turmoil. The end of the economic expansion of the 1990s, the 9/11 tragedy, and the war in Iraq have shocked the international system to an extent not seen in years. Not only have the fairness and adequacy of globalization been doubted by various parties for some time now, but lately its very irreversibility has been called into question by the sheer force of geopolitical and economic turbulence. This book considers the forces that propel globalization and those that resist...

  • Dilip Hiro
    New York: Nation Books, 2007
    ISBN:978-1-56025-544-4

    Oil, as a cheap energy source, contributed so much prosperity and comfort throughout the 20th century. But now the world must wrestle with the notion that supplies are limited and prices are rapidly rising. With “Blood of the Earth: The Battle for the World’s Vanishing Oil Resources,” historian and journalist Dilip Hiro documents the history of oil and anticipates the conflicts and alternatives for the days ahead.

  • Michael Reid
    New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007
    ISBN:978-0-300-11616-8

    The West tends to overlook Latin America, but the politics and economics of the continent remain dynamic, argues Michael Reid, editor of the Americas section of the Economist who has reported on Latin America for that publication as well as the BBC and the Guardian since 1982. Two categories of leaders have emerged in the region, one set populist and the other set outward looking, and struggle to establish a vision for the continent. Reid suggests that governments in Latin America must be assessed based on the many challenges they have and...

  • Ian Shapiro
    Princeton University Press, 2007
    ISBN:978-0-691-12928-0

    Containment is a powerful tool for powerful nations and remains a potent strategy for preserving democracy, argues Ian Shapiro, Sterling Professor of Political Science and director of the MacMillan Center at Yale University. After the 9/11 attacks, the US panicked. The Bush administration quickly abandoned a longstanding US policy of containment without debate or approval from Congress, and instead relied on unilateralism and preemptive attack. As a result, the US has squandered resources and lost credibility around the globe. Containment...

  • Amanat and Frank Griffel
    Stanford University Press, 2007
    ISBN:978-0-8047-5639-6

    Shari’a is considered by many as Islamic religious law. But the cultural concept covers not only moral and legal matters, including religious rituals and rules for marriage, taxation and war, but also issues of behavior and etiquette. Modern and fundamentalist Muslims are polarized over how much modern nations can rely on Shari’a. Yale professors Abbas Amanat and Frank Griffel are editors “Shari’a: Islamic Law in the Contemporary Cotext,” a book of essays that analyze Islamic thought on justice, global citizenship,...