Excerpts

  • Alexandra Harney
    New York: The Penguin Press, 2008
    ISBN:978-1594201578

    Shoppers, manufacturers, workers and public officials are increasingly discomforted, even feeling guilt, by what has become known as the “China price” - the lowest price possible. Low prices carry the cost of environmental degradation, human-rights violations, health hazards and misery, argues Alexandra Harney in her book, “The China Price: The True Cost of Chinese Competitive Advantage.” Large multinational firms impose standards, overlooking falsified reports from managers and suppliers. A former reporter for the Financial Times, Harney...

  • Kishore Mahbubani
    New York: Public Affairs, 2008
    ISBN:978-1-58648-466-8

    Asians have absorbed many Western practices in economics, corporate governance, the rule of law and technology. As a result, by 2050, the world’s three largest economies will be China, India and Japan. To remain relevant, global groups must graciously welcome and incorporate emerging economic powers, writes Kishore Mahbubani, dean and professor of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore. In Chapter 6 of his book, “The New Asian Hemisphere,” Mahbubani assesses the role of the United Nations.

  • Thomas L. Friedman
    New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2008
    ISBN:978-0-374-16685-4

    Economic growth, speeded by globalization and demanding populations, is slowly destroying the planet as we know it. Every minute, yet another species vanishes, reducing the earth’s biodiversity and untapped potential of rich plant and animal resources. In his book “Hot, Flat and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution and How It Can Renew America,” Thomas Friedman makes a passionate argument to recognize what is being lost and to establish a new conservation ethic to reverse some dangerous trends.

  • Yoichi Funabashi
    The Brookings Institution, 2007
    ISBN:978-0-8157-3010-1

    For more than a century, the Korean Peninsula has been the focus of major powers, most recently through the six-power talks, with China, Japan, Russia, South Korea and the United States striving to convince North Korea to give up its nuclear-weapons program. Yoichi Funabashi, editor in chief of the Asahi Shimbun in Tokyo, explores the historical and security concerns of the six nations since 2002 and provides insights into future diplomacy and policymaking for the region.

  • Nayan Chanda
    New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007
    ISBN: 978-0-3001-1201-6

    Globalization, the process of growing interconnectedness, is not a new phenomenon. All that’s new is the ease and speed of the connections. In his book, Nayan Chanda, editor of YaleGlobal Online, follows the exploits of historical traders, preachers, adventurers and warriors in shaping our world, and identifies their modern counterparts at work today. In any case, globalization is here to stay. It coincides with deep human aspirations and transcends the power of individual governments.

  • Mark Matthews
    Nation Books, 2007
    ISBN:1-56858-332-X

    The Israeli-Palestinian conflict continues to haunt the Middle East, and peace remains an elusive goal for world leaders. Journalist Mark Matthews details and analyzes the many lost opportunities for resolving the conflict in recent years, starting with George Bush’s first visit to Israel as governor of Texas and potential presidential candidate, as described in this excerpt. Matthews’ thorough reporting reveals how people affected by such conflict depend on their leaders to seek out connections, overlook cultural differences and...

  • Edited by Ernesto Zedillo
    Routledge, 2007
    ISBN:978-0-415-77185-6

    Contemporary globalization has been severely jeopardized by recent turmoil. The end of the economic expansion of the 1990s, the 9/11 tragedy, and the war in Iraq have shocked the international system to an extent not seen in years. Not only have the fairness and adequacy of globalization been doubted by various parties for some time now, but lately its very irreversibility has been called into question by the sheer force of geopolitical and economic turbulence. This book considers the forces that propel globalization and those that resist...

  • Dilip Hiro
    New York: Nation Books, 2007
    ISBN:978-1-56025-544-4

    Oil, as a cheap energy source, contributed so much prosperity and comfort throughout the 20th century. But now the world must wrestle with the notion that supplies are limited and prices are rapidly rising. With “Blood of the Earth: The Battle for the World’s Vanishing Oil Resources,” historian and journalist Dilip Hiro documents the history of oil and anticipates the conflicts and alternatives for the days ahead.

  • Michael Reid
    New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007
    ISBN:978-0-300-11616-8

    The West tends to overlook Latin America, but the politics and economics of the continent remain dynamic, argues Michael Reid, editor of the Americas section of the Economist who has reported on Latin America for that publication as well as the BBC and the Guardian since 1982. Two categories of leaders have emerged in the region, one set populist and the other set outward looking, and struggle to establish a vision for the continent. Reid suggests that governments in Latin America must be assessed based on the many challenges they have and...

  • Ian Shapiro
    Princeton University Press, 2007
    ISBN:978-0-691-12928-0

    Containment is a powerful tool for powerful nations and remains a potent strategy for preserving democracy, argues Ian Shapiro, Sterling Professor of Political Science and director of the MacMillan Center at Yale University. After the 9/11 attacks, the US panicked. The Bush administration quickly abandoned a longstanding US policy of containment without debate or approval from Congress, and instead relied on unilateralism and preemptive attack. As a result, the US has squandered resources and lost credibility around the globe. Containment...