In The News

James Dao April 7, 2002
The United States has expanded the global war on terrorism to include fighting drug and crime syndicates that operate in countries across Asia, the Middle East, Europe and the Americas. Officials are targeting these networks because evidence shows a complex nexus between crime, drugs, and terrorism. The link between these networks has strengthened since the end of the Cold War, when terrorist...
Howard W. French April 4, 2002
The Japanese have eaten sushi for centuries, making it an important part of their traditional cuisine. Eventually, however, sushi made its way across the Pacific, landing on American plates as an exotic luxury. Once in the United States, sushi morphed to fit American tastes, and un-Japanese ingredients like avocados and cream cheese became staples in American sushi restaurants. This globalized...
Alice H. Amsden January 31, 2002
A quick review of the national origins of leaders at the upcoming 2002 World Economic Forum reveals the provincial nature of purportedly global economic organizations. In order for institutions like the World Trade Organization to live up to their name, says MIT scholar Alice H. Amsden, leaders from semi-industrialized countries like Brazil, Mexico and China must be allowed among international...
January 29, 2002
For the last several decades, mainstream American films made in Hollywood have found a lucrative market around the world, controlling over 80 percent of the entire world market. In Europe, Africa, Asia, and South America, watching Hollywood films is a unique opportunity for many to vicariously experience 'America.' For American filmmakers, the overseas market for Hollywood films is a...
Anon. January 24, 2002
China’s workforce lacks internationally recognized qualifications that will allow China to fully globalize its economy. Although there are plenty of workers in the fields of finance, information technology, and international trade among others, the level of expertise falls below global levels. This lack of talent will mean that China will rely more and more on foreign workers in order to...
Elisabeth Rosenthal December 11, 2001
Chinese officials are suppressing open discussion of AIDS, hindering already limited efforts to combat the spiraling epidemic. Rural areas - particularly in central China - emerged as the epicenter of the HIV-AIDS epidemic as farmers were exposed to the virus while selling blood. For years, the infected farmers remained ignorant about AIDS because the government withheld vital information. Now...
Salman Rushdie November 2, 2001
In this New York Times op-ed article, controversial novelist Salman Rushdie rejects the official US stance that the war against terrorism is not about Islam. The US dissociates terrorism from Islam to maintain the global coalition against terrorism that necessarily includes Muslim countries. However, Rushdie says, Muslim demonstrations around the world in support of Osama bin Laden and the much...