In The News

Sona Patel and Alan Yuhas April 16, 2019
A fire destroyed the roof of the Cathedral of Notre-Dame, causing the spire to collapse, and the New York Times reports “an outpouring of grief in France and around the world as the symbol of French culture and history burned.” The cathedral had been been under construction. Citizens and tourists watched from around the city, and people around the world watched the footage on social media and...
Guy Faulconbridge, Kate Holton and Costas Pitas April 12, 2019
Julian Assange, founder of WikiLeaks, took refuge in the Ecuadorean embassy in London seven years ago after Sweden issued an arrest warrant for a rape charge. British police arrested him after Ecuador ended asylum; a judge convicted him on skipping bail. “Just hours later, U.S. prosecutors charged Assange with conspiracy in trying to access a classified U.S. government computer with former U.S....
Robin Harding April 12, 2019
Japan’s low fertility rate, less than 1.5 births per woman, and strict immigration policies contribute to a population that is aging and shrinking. Japanese who were part of a baby boom just before World War II are now dying. The population is 126.4 million and without policy changes is projected to drop by half in less than 100 years. “A strong economy and immigration reforms by Prime Minister...
April 9, 2019
Recent protests in Algeria and Sudan have brought popular images of the so-called 2011 Arab Spring back to the fore – yet with a stark difference. As an article for the Economist observes, “The wars and chaos that followed the Arab spring have cooled the ardour of activists and their regional patrons …. [and] autocrats have sharpened their tools of repression in order to quash protests at home...
Nathan Thrall March 31, 2019
Support for strong US-Israel relations crossed party lines from the 1970s to the start of this century. More recently, though, a rift has opened between the two major parties as surveys show that the least pro-Israel demographics – among black, Hispanic, the young and nonreligious voters – represent a larger proportion of the Democratic Party. "Many blacks and Hispanics draw strong parallels...
Cindy Sher March 21, 2019
A lot of trade goes into a cup of coffee, and at the urging of his son, authur A.J. Jacobs wanted to express his gratitude. So he set out to research the individuals who helped make the routine of a morning cup of coffee possible and wrote a book. “During his quest, which took him from a farm in Colombia to a steel plant in Indiana, he discovered how interconnected the world is,” explains Cindy...
Sinéad Baker March 20, 2019
Investigations by governments and internet companies point to Russian meddling during election campaigns, including the 2016 Brexit vote and the US presidential race, with outlandish social media messages and promotion of falsehoods. Yet, Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a law outlining penalties for distribution of whatever the state decides is fake news. “With this new law, Russia...