In The News

Seth Schiesel February 20, 2003
Along with a host of smarter, more powerful bombs and planes, the United States is preparing a new type of weapon for war in Iraq: the directed-energy device. The devices use microwaves to disable anything digital and could destroy, for example, computerized Iraqi control centers. The US, with its computer-dependent military, is especially vulnerable to these weapons, however, and terrorist...
David Rhode January 20, 2003
Through a complicated system of sham online auctions and falsely registered mailboxes, a 25-year old Pakistani man reportedly stole more than $3 million in computer equipment from U.S. companies. He was able to do all this in his own home through the internet, taking full advantage of the integrated world economy. – YaleGlobal
James Gorman January 12, 2003
Museums around the US are attempting to move their collections into cyberspace. Once completed, digitization projects such as that at the American Museum of Natural History will allow anyone around the globe with a connection to the internet to browse and study images and notes on millions of fossils, plants, animals, and – of course – pieces of art. "The goal, officials at several museums...
Clive Thompson December 15, 2002
For many people in the world, talk of globalization and new telecommunications technology is irrelevant; the world’s poorest don’t have enough to eat, let alone access to the Internet. But in Laos, an American nonprofit organization is working with Laotian farmers to set up a computer that they can use to check weather patterns and rice pricing. The farmers have no electricity or phone service...
Pragati Verma December 13, 2002
Fear of losing a huge market and a software development market may be pushing Microsoft to do what it hates doing – share with select customers its closely guarded software secrets. The fact that the Indian government is seriously considering the wide use of networked computers for administration could open up a huge market. In Asia, Microsoft has shared the Windows source code with only select...
December 10, 2002
A high-court ruling in Australia may make it possible to sue a publication for libel from halfway around the world. An Australian businessman sued the Dow Jones Company using the libel laws in his home state of Victoria, claiming that because he could access the Wall Street Journal website from Victoria, any libelous material on that website could be prosecuted under Victoria’s jurisdiction....
Joseph Kahn December 4, 2002
"Defying predictions that the Internet was inherently too diverse and malleable for state control, China has denied a vast majority of its 46 million Internet users access to information that it feels could weaken its authoritarian power." That's the conclusion of a new survey of internet use in China done by a team of researchers at Harvard University. The six-month study found...