In The News

Jennifer Lien August 26, 2002
For the first time, Hewlett-Packard has used a company other than Intel to supply them with microprocessors for one of their business PC’s. In these times of “economic belt-tightening,” IT companies have begun to branch out in an effort to corner other markets. Dell recently released a “white-box” no-name PC onto the market to be sold through small retailers at especially low prices....
James Lamont August 22, 2002
As globalization extends its reach, the use of technology becomes an issue that affects both advanced and developing nations. The United States has been supplying southern African countries with genetically modified (GM) crops as famine relief. But some NGO’s believe that the US is trying to use southern Africa’s poverty to push for global acceptance of genetically modified food. Although the WHO...
Erik Eckholm August 4, 2002
Though the Chinese government is notorious for keeping tabs on the information its citizens can access, it is having a harder time now that the Internet’s popularity has surged in recent years. Surfing the web is cheap and fast at any of 200,000 cyber cafes around the country. Though many anticipated that the Internet would be primarily a forum for dissidents and a force for political change,...
Jason Leow July 10, 2002
Using relatively cheap technology, followers of Falungong were able to interrupt the World Cup Finals and the anniversary of the Hong Kong handover broadcast on Chinese state television. Their purpose was to counteract state propaganda that has branded Falungong as an evil cult. While most of the interruptions were in rural China, which often receives TV programs celebrating China’s modernization...
William J. Holstein April 28, 2002
Internet armies don't necessarily have fatigues, guns, or the same citizenship. What they do have, however, is internet technology and a common ideology. As author Richard Hunter contends in an interview with the New York Times, groups ranging from anti-globalization activists to Al Qaeda terrorists are increasingly held together by the internet. Though the fluid spread of ideas across...
John Markoff April 20, 2002
Japan recently unveiled a supercomputer so powerful that it would take the 20 fastest American supercomputers combined to rival it. The innovation has shocked U.S. computer scientists who have dominated the supercomputer-building scene for the last decade. Some believe the reason that the Japanese model was able to outstrip American models was the focus behind its production. The Japanese...
John Noble Wilford March 7, 2002
Dr. Alan R. Templeton, a population biologist at Washington University in St. Louis, believes that he has discovered primitive Homo sapiens’ initial migration out of Africa to be more than half a million years ago. Previously, the popular “Out of Africa” theory of modern human origin set the initial migration at only 100,000 years ago. Many scientists argue that these new findings will make the...