In The News

Scott B. MacDonald October 13, 2008
As profits surge, financial players eschew government intervention, but crave rescue as problems emerge. Public confidence in banks around the globe could make a cautious comeback, after the UK-led massive semi-nationalization of banks with "equity injection." This YaleGlobal series explores the global financial crisis, detailing how US troubles over mortgage-backed securities and the...
Manu Bhaskaran October 10, 2008
Speed of transportation and communication that characterize today’s global supply chain requires trust and flow of credit along the many steps: But now consumers worry about the future of their jobs, retailers and manufacturers worry about sales, suppliers worry about orders and lenders clutch to their reserves of cash. In the second article of the YaleGlobal series addressing the repercussions...
Linda Lim September 29, 2008
During the 1997-98 Asian financial crisis, US financial experts lectured Asians to accept good governance, transparency and free-market outcomes while avoiding drastic government intervention. Asian nations indeed tightened their belts, saving funds and seeking out safe havens for funds, including US Treasury bills. “This inflow of foreign lending conveniently enabled the Bush administration to...
Steven Pearlstein September 24, 2008
The global economy is in crisis, with giant financial institutions folding, banks refusing to lend to other banks and some countries closing, changing stock-market rules and currencies dropping in value. “What we are witnessing may be the greatest destruction of financial wealth that the world has ever seen – paper losses measured in the trillions of dollars,” writes Steven Pearlstein for the...
David Dapice September 17, 2008
Low interest rates prompted many investors and homeowners to pour savings into real estate and homes. Investors, convinced that prices could not fall, purchased debt packages including mortgages based on ample credit with little down payments. Prices for homes and investments soared, with the total value of US housing going from about $12 trillion in 2000 to more than $20 trillion in 2006. Now,...
Xu Sitao January 24, 2008
As anxiety spread about a possible recession hitting the US, stock-indexes went into sharp decline in Europe and Asia. Not surprisingly, worried investors scrutinize the Chinese stock market, as conventional wisdom suggests that China investments are the world’s next over-valued bubble. But analyst Steven Xu points out that the Chinese market could continue to grow, especially this year as China...
David Dapice January 22, 2008
Stock-market indexes have tumbled like dominos around the globe, exposing vulnerability of intricate economic connections. A crisis in one nation – and the panic – can quickly bounce from one country to the next. A major cause behind the stock-market plunges the world over are US financial instruments designed to spread and protect risk by including all manner of home mortgages, explains...