In The News

Erik Eckholm April 23, 2003
After revealing an increase in SARS cases in Beijing, Chinese officials have shut down the city's primary and secondary schools for at least two weeks. The city recently admitted it had concealed the severity of the epidemic, and is now struggling to contain both the disease and related public panic. In an effort to maintain a semblance of routine, and aided by a recent increase in computer...
Ching Cheong April 22, 2003
According to this article in Singapore's Straits Times, China's mishandling of the Sars epidemic is in part due to the communist country's heavy-handed control of its media and its proclivity for " putting its image above all else, including the lives of its people." Citing political corruption and ambition as the hallmark of China's communist party, the author...
Michael Richardson April 21, 2003
Greater openness in tourism and trade, on which much of Asia's recent economic growth has been based, is coming back to haunt countries from South Korea to Thailand. The extent of the economic fall-out from the Sars epidemic is only just becoming apparent, but WHO estimates already place the global costs at $30 billion and rising. With China's true infection numbers still unknown and...
Keith Bradsher April 21, 2003
Around the Asia-Pacific region, the economic impact of Sars is being immediately felt. In one Australian fishing area, lack of demand from Hong Kong restaurants – the industry's biggest customers – means that some fishermen might not make their home mortgage payments. Meanwhile, thousands of miles away, in India, a software company executive worries about the wisdom of his company's...
Susan Jakes April 21, 2003
According to this report in Time magazine, dozens of Sars patients in Beijing were moved from their hospital beds just hours before officials from the World Health Organization arrived to inspect their wards. Despite fears of reprisal, doctors in several Beijing hospitals spoke out against their government's handling of the health care crisis. Lack of access to Sars patients in China has...
Lawrence K. Altman April 17, 2003
The SARS virus is definitely caused by a new form of the coronavirus family, says the director of the World Health Organization. Immediately after the virus was discovered in Hong Kong in March, WHO put together a team of 13 laboratories around the world to search for the root of the virus. Experiments on monkeys in Rotterdam confirmed identified coronavirus as the culprit. Thanks to advances...
Elisabeth Rosenthal April 10, 2003
Beijing is lying about number of cases, retired military doctor says.