In The News

Elizabeth Farrelly February 9, 2020
Heavy rain falling in eastern Australia has doused the bushfires but not the horrific memories of destruction. Australians must rethink how they build cities and prepare for a changing climate. “Cities have always been shaped by fire,” writes Elizabeth Farrelly for the Sydney Morning Herald, and she refers to the sturdy, stark architecture that followed the 1666 Great Fire of London that...
Tom Perkins February 8, 2020
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, are a group of about 5,000 manmade fluorinated chemicals, widely used to produce waterproof and stain-resistant textiles. These chemicals, which don’t break down naturally, are known as “forever chemicals.” But they are also water soluble, polluting soil and nearby drinking-water sources.” It is estimated that PFAS are in 99% of Americans’ blood, and...
Yascha Mounk and Roberto Stefan Foa February 7, 2020
Democracy requires hard work, patience, compromise and trust. Citizens may be dissatisfied with a leader but must stay informed and engaged in politics. Yet support for democracy around the world is in decline. The University of Cambridge’s Centre for the Future of Democracy analyzed data from more than 154 countries, 3,500 surveys covering more than 4 million respondents, and social-science...
Kathy Katella February 7, 2020
The new coronavirus originating in China has spread quickly in a globalized world of frequent travel and cross-border trade. But globalization of communications also ensures timely reports on symptoms and best practices as well as collaboration among the world’s public health researchers. So far, 35,000 cases have been confirmed with more than 700 deaths. The new virus, believed to have started...
Stephen S. Roach February 6, 2020
Global recessions are rare, but the world may have dodged one in 2019. The world posted GDP growth of 2.9 percent that year, far below the average 3.5 percent posted since 1980. Deviations from the trend signal a warning even for strong economies and corporations, suggests economist Stephen S. Roach with Yale University. “Unlike individual economies, which normally contract in an outright...
Georg Fahrion, Kristina Gnirke, Veronika Hackenbroch, Martin Hesse, Martin U. Müller, Katharina Graça Peters, Michael Sauga and Bernhard Zand February 6, 2020
A coronavirus moves through populations with astounding speed. A Wuhan doctor identified seven cases as a public health issue on December 30. Local authorities berated him for breaking the law before he fell ill, too. The world reports 20,000 confirmed cases in 24 countries with more than 500 deaths. China, responsible for about one-third of global economic growth, responded by closing businesses...
Shayera Dark February 6, 2020
US President Donald Trump has signed an executive order extending travel restrictions for citizens of six countries including Eritrea, Kyrgyzstan, Myanmar, Nigeria, Sudan, and Tanzania. Previous orders restricted travel for Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen as well as Chad, North Korea and Venezuela. Nigerians express concern about blocks on family members, and current visa holders...