Jobs are the lifeblood for national economies and family budgets. The search for economic opportunity often drives people to move around the globe. The most educated and highly skilled workers are in demand, and immigration policies often reflect that priority. Less skilled would-be immigrants, however, are often subject to tighter restrictions – even in nations where native citizens refuse to take on harvesting, construction, cleaning or other difficult tasks. Advanced technology reduces the need for labor; employers also rely on outsourcing, contract workers and the internet for digital work, including tax preparation, X-ray analysis or graphic design. Nations fiercely compete for jobs while multinational corporations reduce labor costs to increase profits.

Unwanted Immigrants: America’s Deportation Dilemma

Passing immigration laws is easy – moving the uninvited people back home is far more difficult
Joseph Chamie
July 27, 2010

The World at Play: Soccer Takes on Globalization

The game offers lessons for managing movement of talented professionals around the world
Branko Milanovic
June 15, 2010

Debt and Unemployment: Is Global Capitalism Responsible? – Part II

Lingering high joblessness in US threatens global prosperity
David Dapice
April 26, 2010

Public and Government Views on Migration Diverge

Turmoil likely until the costs and benefits of immigration are addressed frankly
Joseph Chamie
October 16, 2009

Thai Workers Fly to Sweden Where the Wild Berries Are

Temporary work by thousands offer jam for Swedes and earning for Thais
Bertil Lintner
September 23, 2009

Will the Crisis Reverse Global Migration?

The crisis will affect migration, but less than feared and in more complex ways
Jayati Ghosh
July 14, 2009

Spiegel Online: Eight Myths of Migration

Hein de Haas
March 23, 2017

We Can’t Undo Globalization, But Can Improve It

Job hunters should relocate, and companies could expand export capability
Gary Pinkus, James Manyika and Sree Ramaswamy
January 10, 2017