As governments confront many challenges that are global in scale, leaders find they must cooperate in responding to financial, climate, terrorism and other crises. As a result, a global audience has developed keen interest in how and why nations select their leaders. On one hand, citizens expect sensible and collective action, transparency and fair representation; on the other hand, citizens and leaders fret about compromising security, sovereignty or loss of control. Diplomats and global organizations like the United Nations aim to achieve a balance, even as global communications allow citizens in democracies or authoritarian states to steer attention to issues. Attention to citizen demands and multilateral cooperation contribute to stability.

Balancing Reactions

France's controversial anti-hijab bill continues to spark protests on Egyptian campuses
Gihan Shahine
March 1, 2004

Bangladesh’s Challenge

Country is positioned to become a strong economic competitor
Philip Bowring
February 20, 2009

Illusions of Empire: Defining the New American Order

Five new books examine the state of the US 'empire'
G. John Ikenberry
March 2, 2004

Afghanistan’s Perilous Roads: Allies Struggle to Find Safer Supply Route

NATO looks to one-time “axis of evil” member for safe route into war zone
Dieter Bednarz
February 18, 2009

Fischer Sees Turkey's Membership in EU as Part of War on Terror

German foreign minister speaks out for EU constitution, against direct democracy
Sam Hapgood
March 5, 2004