As governments confront many challenges that are global in scale, leaders find they must cooperate in responding to financial, climate, terrorism and other crises. As a result, a global audience has developed keen interest in how and why nations select their leaders. On one hand, citizens expect sensible and collective action, transparency and fair representation; on the other hand, citizens and leaders fret about compromising security, sovereignty or loss of control. Diplomats and global organizations like the United Nations aim to achieve a balance, even as global communications allow citizens in democracies or authoritarian states to steer attention to issues. Attention to citizen demands and multilateral cooperation contribute to stability.

Still Waiting For The President's `Humble' Foreign Policy

It is time to return to the middle path between present unilateralism and isolationism of the past
Gustav Ranis
February 12, 2004

Kerry Donors Include 'Benedict Arnolds'

Candidate decries tax-haven firms while accepting executives' aid
Jim VandeHei
February 26, 2004

Edwards Notes Differences on Issue of World Trade

Says John Kerry has always favored free trade and globalization
Katherine Q. Seelye
February 20, 2004

Not Everyone Got It Wrong on Iraq's Weapons

Scott Ritter, for one, was not.
Scott Ritter
February 5, 2004

China Clamps Down on Web News Discussion

The internet destabilizes Chinese politics
Mark Magnier
February 26, 2004