The links between security and globalization were highlighted by the 2001 terrorist attacks on New York City and Washington, DC, and the subsequent long wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Lingering poverty, inequality, religious extremism and war can sow discontent and resentment as unprecedented global mobility lends access to education and travel in other countries. Despite use of drones, cyber-warfare and other advanced weapons technology to mount counterterrorist attacks, the marginalized can strike out at vulnerable urban or economic centers. Annual global defense spending exceeds $1.6 trillion. Containing the trade in weapons, whether nuclear bombs or assault rifles, and preventing them from falling into the wrong hands remain a challenge.

Obama’s Worst Pakistan Nightmare

Because of nuclear weapons, Pakistan stands as the bigger challenge for Obama than either Iraq or Afghanistan
David E. Sanger
January 13, 2009

U.S. Won't Lift Sanctions Until Libya Keeps Its Word

To avoid sending the wrong message to North Korea and others, US keeps up economic pressure
Steven Weisman
December 21, 2003

Europe Fears Civil Unrest

Failing to control economic decline, leaders discuss handling citizen anger and possible protests
Peter O'Neil
January 26, 2009

U.S. and Europeans Agree on Sharing of Airline Passenger Data

A trans-Atlantic showdown over privacy rights is averted
Philip Shenon
December 17, 2003

A New Front, but It's Still One War

"How many battles can the United States take on at one time?"
David E. Sanger
October 20, 2002