As governments confront many challenges that are global in scale, leaders find they must cooperate in responding to financial, climate, terrorism and other crises. As a result, a global audience has developed keen interest in how and why nations select their leaders. On one hand, citizens expect sensible and collective action, transparency and fair representation; on the other hand, citizens and leaders fret about compromising security, sovereignty or loss of control. Diplomats and global organizations like the United Nations aim to achieve a balance, even as global communications allow citizens in democracies or authoritarian states to steer attention to issues. Attention to citizen demands and multilateral cooperation contribute to stability.

Taiwan: More Than a Trump Card for US Dealing With Beijing

Arms sales for Taiwan fit Trump’s insistence that US allies must shoulder more defense costs
Wenran Jiang
December 15, 2016

OPEC Cobbles a Deal, But Cannot Hide Decline of Saudi Power

OPEC and Russia agree to limit production, but deal may not hold – Saudi influence fades as oil cartel loses dominance
Chris Miller
December 8, 2016

Taiwan, Thorn in China’s Side, Gets New Attention

Taiwan issue underscores limits of power for the US and China – and the calcification of international policymaking
Mark Harrison
December 6, 2016

China and the US Undercut International Law for Their Narrow Interests

International law requires the consent of all parties, but China and the US reject when decisions cross short-term strategic interests
Humphrey Hawksley
November 17, 2016

China and the US: Two Visions, One Collaboration?

China-US collaboration on infrastructure projects in Asia could reduce extremism, improve relations and help companies
Marc Grossman
November 15, 2016

Crazy Campaign Ends With Upset, and Hard Work of Governing Begins

Trump wins contentious US election for president, but globalization loses with a bitterly divided electorate
David Dapice
November 10, 2016

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